Articles

  • Green light to new confrontation at Tia Maria

    14 July 2019

    Tía María is no longer just a conflict between the farmers and people of the Tambo valley in Arequipa and a mining company, Southern Peru Copper, but a conflict over the future of mining investment in Peru and the rights of people to oppose projects that threaten their social and environmental standing.

  • Report points to the negative impacts of infrastructure development in Amazonia

    14 July 2019

    On 8 July, Anthony Bebbington, Denise Humphreys Bebbington and César Gamboa presented a recent study that explores the impact of extractive industries and infrastructure projects (EII) on deforestation in Amazonia. The report is part of a larger study commissioned by the Climate and Land Use Alliance to explore the impacts of EII on forest loss in the Amazon, Mexico, Central America and Indonesia.

  • New culture minister inherits poisoned chalice

    14 July 2019

    Yet another minister of culture was sworn in last week, Luis Jaime Castillo, an archaeologist. He replaces Ulla Homquist who had only lasted four months in post and left for health reasons. Castillo is the fourth minister in President Martín Vizcarra’s 16-month presidency.

  • FTA body gives green light for a potentially ground-breaking inquiry into environmental infringement

    6 July 2019

    At issue here is Peru’s recent Law 30723 that promotes road building in Amazonia regardless of legitimate concerns of indigenous peoples, especially those living in voluntary isolation. With the support of SPDA, the Peruvian Society for Environmental Rights, the indigenous organisation FENAMAD brought a test case in 2018 specifically to protect the Cacataibo of the Ucayali region, who live on the frontier with Brazil.

  • Rosa Bartra and the art of delay

    6 July 2019

    As widely predicted, the ‘fujiaprista’ majority on the congressional constitution committee appear to be doing their best to procrastinate in delivering the political reforms demanded of them by the executive. With the closure of Congress fast approaching on 25 July, the committee has only delivered on two of the six proposals put before it by the executive branch.

  • Conflict between indigenous community and land grabbers worsens

    6 July 2019

    Conflict has once again broken out in the San Martín region with indigenous communities threatening to expel non-indigenous invaders if state-led mediation fails to restore land occupied two decades ago.

  • Tia Maria moves down to the wire

    29 June 2019

    The latest battle for Tía María is about to be engaged. The large copper project in the province of Islay in the department of Arequipa has been the focus of strong social discord since 2011: two major waves of social protest in 2011 and again in 2015 resulted in seven deaths and many wounded. The cases of protesters charged with disturbing the peace are still in the courts.

  • Political reforms move ahead, slowly

    29 June 2019

    The slow and arduous process of legislating the government’s proposals for political reform moved ahead last week with the approval by the congressional constitution commission of various articles of the legislative bill known as 4188. The commission debated and approved Articles 13, 15, 16, 17 and 18.

  • Ancient irrigation methods may have contemporary relevance

    29 June 2019

    Peru suffers from a shortage of water and this deficiency will only worsen. A recent study suggests reinventing in the modern context some of the methods used by Inca and pre-Inca Andean civilisations.

  • Constitutional commission approves new party registration rules

    23 June 2019

    On 20 June, the constitutional committee of the Peruvian Congress approved new rules to govern the registration of political parties. Assuming that the rules are approved in the plenum, this will make it far easier for new political groupings to achieve official recognition for electoral purposes. It amends the existing Law on Political Parties.

  • PSG Aims

    The Peru Support Group exists to promote social inclusion, sustainable development and the observance of human rights in Peru. To that end the PSG highlights shortcomings in observance of established norms, whether international or local in nature, in its research, advocacy and publications. In so doing, it underscores the relationships that exist within the political system, how institutions work, and the effectiveness of policies that aim to reduce poverty and inequality within the context of sustainable development.

  • Historical Overview

    Over the past century Peru has suffered a series of autocratic governments and a civil war in which nearly 70,000 people died. Many of the country's ongoing political and social problems are a legacy of its somewhat turbulent past. 

  • Human Rights

    Human rights violations were widespread during the twenty years after the initiation of armed conflict in 1980. Efforts to convict perpetrators since the war's end have made only limited progress. Today, concerns remain over the treatment of those engaged in social protest, particularly against strategically important investment projects.

  • Why join the PSG?

    • Keep up to date with latest news and developments in Peru
    • Learn about key issues of poverty, development and human rights in Peru
    • Support the work of the Peru Support Group

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